The Electronic Journal of Business Research Methods provides perspectives on topics relevant to research in the field of business and management
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Journal Article

Fact‑Based Understanding of Business Survey Non‑Response  pp83-92

Karsten Boye Rasmussen, Heiko Thimm

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, ECRM 2009, Editor: Ann Brown, Joseph Azzopardi, Frank Bezzina, pp1 - 116

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Abstract

A 2007‑2008 two‑nation business survey was carried out by two universities and supporting business development agencies. The intention of describing small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) and their use of information technology and cooperation was disrupted by a very low response rate. Some practices concerning nonresponse (Rogelberg & Stanton, 2007) are discussed and implemented. The collected data are compared to data known in advance from registers for the nonresponding companies. Also, a second data set with concise answer information from nonrespondents was obtained by phone for categorization of the nonrespondents. Finally the nonresponse is related to data about contact between the companies and business development agencies to illuminate interest as the dependent variable. The article is an investigation into nonresponse at the organizational level and demonstrates throughout the article how facts obtained by other methods (multi mode) besides the central survey can improve the understanding of nonresponse.

 

Keywords: business survey, fact-based, nonresponse, self-selection, regional development, SMEs

 

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Journal Article

Using a Multimethod Approach to Research Enterprise Systems Implementations  pp95-108

José Esteves, Joan Pastor

© Jul 2003 Volume 2 Issue 2, Editor: Arthur Money, pp47 - 170

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Abstract

This paper explores the use of multimethod research design. With the development and legitimacy of both qualitative and quantitative research, the combination of both types is expanding. In this paper we present how we have explored the multimethod approach by using an example domain in a step‑by‑step manner, learning about the strengths and weaknesses of this approach. The context is a doctoral research project whose aim is to study critical success factors for Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) implementation projects.

 

Keywords: Enterprise Resource Planning, critical success factors, implementation phases, ERP implementation projects

 

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Journal Article

Historiography — A Neglected Research Method in Business and Management Studies  pp161-170

John O'Brien, Dan Remenyi, Aideen Keaney

© Jul 2003 Volume 2 Issue 2, Editor: Arthur Money, pp47 - 170

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Abstract

The objective of this speculative paper is to open a debate as to the importance of historiography in the field of business and management studies and to this end the paper argues that it is an under utilised research paradigm. It is the paper's contention that history has a special role to play in academic research. It contextualises the issues being studied and it gives shape to the parameters of the understanding which is offered by the research. Without access to a history of the issues and the ideas being examined it is difficult to make sense of the current situation. Being able to have a broad perspective of the history and the current situation opens the way to being able to make a valuable contribution to the theoretical body of knowledge in the field. Business and management studies can obtain much from historiography and this paper indicates.how it may be used in this context and its affinity with other accepted narrative based research paradigms already in use in this field.

 

Keywords: and phrases History, historiography, historicism, context, knowledge, facts and figures, and phrases pedagogical understanding, facts, case studies, critical realism, dialectic, story, narrative

 

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Journal Article

Through a Glass Darkly: Fact and Filtration in the Interpretation of Evidence  pp11-24

Frank Bannister

© Sep 2005 Volume 3 Issue 1, Editor: Arthur Money, pp1 - 92

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Abstract

For almost three decades, the primary fault line in information systems research has been between positivist and interpretivist research philosophies. The kernel of the debate between these two approaches rotates around the meaning of reality, two aspects of which are what constitutes a fact and what constitutes evidence. In this paper the nature of fact in interpretivist research is explored. The range of filters through which research must travel is catalogued and it is argued that a taxonomy of fact emerges from interpretivist research.

 

Keywords: fact, intepretivism, research, filters

 

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Journal Article

Motivators for Australian Consumers to Search and Shop Online  pp47-56

Ian Michael

© Nov 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Arthur Money, pp1 - 66

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Abstract

This paper investigates the factors that motivate Australian consumers to use the Internet to search and shop for products and services. A qualitative research method was used, utilizing a semi‑structured, in‑depth interview technique. Twenty in‑depth interviews were conducted, using a snowball sampling method. The study found that there were six motivating factors that drew consumers to search and shop online for products and services. These factors include: convenience, saving time, cheaper prices along with the ability to compare prices, good place to shop for specialty and hard‑to‑access products, higher level of consumer control, and the ease of comparing products and services.

 

Keywords: Motivating factors, Internet, consumer behaviour, search, shop, online

 

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Journal Article

Generating a new Interview Method by using Sensing Technology to Assess Human Emotions  pp110-120

Yayoi Hirose, Kiyoshi Itao, Tomohiro Umeda

© Dec 2012 Volume 10 Issue 2, ECRM, Editor: Ann Brown, pp53 - 153

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Abstract

This study aims at generating new interview methods for obtaining more detailed information regarding human emotional factors by utilizing sensing technology. It can improve the weaknesses of qualitative research past discussions have pointed out, and develop the validity of collected data and more objective analysis of collected data in qualitative research. As the first step for a new research method, the study uses two types of sensing device which assess the emotional condition of an interviewee. The first device is ST technology, voice analysis software and a system of emotion estimation. This device using voice analysis defines what emotional condition the interviewees have. When the interviewee makes a statement, the ST technology can investigate his‑her emotional condition, such as whether the interviewee stated it disappointedly, delightly, or angrily, while the conventional coding simply relies on text data. The second device is WHS‑1, portable sensing device. This device investigates whether the interviewee stated certain things in a relaxed or stressed condition by measuring heart rate and analysing the condition of autonomic nerves. The study finally adopts both devices to precisely assess the interviewee’s emotional condition, and demonstrates that the two devices enable the researcher to obtain closer view of the interviewees. The study suggests that generally the two types of sensing device can play a supportive role in analysing emotional factors for interview research. While the researcher can only ascertain stressful or delightful factors based on coding analysis, using sensing devices enables the researcher to identify how stressful or joyful the interviewee is, and why they are in this state, ie. are they stressed due to anger or sorrow? It is expected to enable the researcher to more deeply consider the reason the interviewee is in a certain emotional condition, and also lead to contextual or theoretical discussion.

 

Keywords: interview method, qualitative research, sensing technology, emotional factor

 

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Journal Article

Making the Case for a Mixed Methods Design in a Bourdieusian Analysis of Family Firms  pp135-146

Udeni Salmon

© Nov 2016 Volume 14 Issue 2, Editor: Ann Brown, pp71 - 167

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Abstract

This paper justifies a mixed methods design in a Bourdieusian analysis of SME family manufacturing firms in the UK. Despite the extensive use of Bourdieu in sociological research, there have been few attempts to apply his powerful “thinking tools” of doxa, habitus and fields (Bourdieu, 1979) to business studies. The research methodology outlined in this study adopts a fresh approach to a Bourdieusian analysis of the distinctive nature of family firms, known as “familiness” (T. M. Zellweger, Eddleston, & Kellermanns, 2010). Bourdieu used diverse research methods, including in‑depth interviews, photographs and large‑scale questionnaires to develop his concepts of doxa, fields and habitus. Therefore the philosophical underpinning has suggested a particular methodological design. Adopting a QUAN + QUAL approach (Creswell & Plano Clark, 2011, p. 110), this paper will describe the rationale for the choice of mixed methodology, the relationship of the design to the research aim and objectives, the challenges of each research stage and the case for a mixed methods research design. The quantitative stage identifies trends and correlations between innovation and family firms in the manufacturing sector using a government‑commissioned dataset. The qualitative stage is an in‑depth analysis of 27 interviews with family firms. The final stage will compare and contrast the analysis from both stages to arrive at a fuller understanding of the phenomenon of “familiness”. This paper will not outline the results from the study, which will be the subject of further papers. It is intended that the contribution of this study will assist family firm researchers to design effective research approaches when exploring the complex nature of family firms. Furthermore, the

 

Keywords: Mixed methods, Bourdieu, family firms, familiness, manufacturing, innovation

 

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Journal Article

Augmenting Social Media Research with Q Methodology: Some Guiding Principles  pp155-164

Charmaine du Plessis

© Sep 2019 Volume 17 Issue 3, Editor: Ann Brown, pp102 - 191

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Abstract

This paper proposes that social media studies could be complemented with Q methodology when a topic that plays out in social media is complex, controversial or sensitive to allow for deep‑seated, integrated online and off‑line perspectives. Although the Fourth Industrial Revolution brought researchers more opportunities and advantages to study topics that were previously inaccessible, using technologies for research does not come without challenges. This is especially the case with social media studies comprising large datasets and where it is not always possible to identify fake profiles, bots, spam or manipulated information without having access to advanced data analysis software. Another point is that views expressed in social media do not always represent offline perspectives. However, while Q methodology has, over the years, adapted its techniques to accommodate new technologies, more can be done to embrace a web 2.0 environment. Why and how social media studies could be augmented with Q methodology to reveal individuals’ perspectives and attitudes about topics will be examined and potential difficulties will be highlighted. Not yet a mainstream method, Q methodology combines the strengths of two robust qualitative and quantitative methods sequentially to reveal and isolate the subjective perspectives of groups of participants. This methodology could, therefore, be useful when a social media study puts forward novel ideas and findings that should be supported by offline views. In this regard, the paper provides some guidelines by referring to the five phases of a Q study and describing how a social media study could not only benefit from but also apply Q methodology to augment results. Supplementing social media research with Q methodology could be empowering and provide opportunities for further research and debate.

 

Keywords: mixed method, social media research, Q factor analysis, Q methodology, Q study

 

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