The Electronic Journal of Business Research Methods provides perspectives on topics relevant to research in the field of business and management
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Journal Article

Historiography — A Neglected Research Method in Business and Management Studies  pp161-170

John O'Brien, Dan Remenyi, Aideen Keaney

© Jul 2003 Volume 2 Issue 2, Editor: Arthur Money, pp47 - 170

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Abstract

The objective of this speculative paper is to open a debate as to the importance of historiography in the field of business and management studies and to this end the paper argues that it is an under utilised research paradigm. It is the paper's contention that history has a special role to play in academic research. It contextualises the issues being studied and it gives shape to the parameters of the understanding which is offered by the research. Without access to a history of the issues and the ideas being examined it is difficult to make sense of the current situation. Being able to have a broad perspective of the history and the current situation opens the way to being able to make a valuable contribution to the theoretical body of knowledge in the field. Business and management studies can obtain much from historiography and this paper indicates.how it may be used in this context and its affinity with other accepted narrative based research paradigms already in use in this field.

 

Keywords: and phrases History, historiography, historicism, context, knowledge, facts and figures, and phrases pedagogical understanding, facts, case studies, critical realism, dialectic, story, narrative

 

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Journal Article

Researching Organisational Change in Higher Education: A Holistic Tripartite Approach  pp150-161

Dr Lois Farquharson, Dr Tammi Sinha, Susanne Clarke

© Oct 2018 Volume 16 Issue 3, Editor: Ann Brown, pp103 - 172

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Abstract

In the UK context, it is important to acknowledge that there are multiple change drivers in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) that result in a proliferation of foci. Gornitzka (1999) and Allen (2003) suggest that the distinctiveness of governance, professional autonomy and the tradition of academic freedom in HEIs should be reflected in change processes, and therefore traditional frameworks for change could be adapted in an attempt to research and manage change. This paper explores how theoretical and practical tools for managing and researching change can be integrated in order to support change, whilst reflecting on the methods used. The journey of the authors towards the development of a holistic framework for researching and supporting change in Higher Education (HE), with a focus on two HEIs, is explored. The synergies of Lean Management (Wincel and Krull, 2013), Appreciative Inquiry (Cooperrider and Srivastva 1987), and Participatory Action Research (Greenwood et al, 1993) are examined through three stages of practice‑based fieldwork to establish their positioning within a holistic tripartite framework for researching and supporting organizational change. The benefits and challenges of this framework are discussed with attention to the importance of future research to provide more evidence of the impact of this framework.

 

Keywords: Appreciative Inquiry, Organisational Change, Lean Management, World café, Story-telling, Participative Action Research.

 

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Journal Article

The Dimension of Time: Historiography in Information Systems Research  pp1-10

Frank Bannister

© Jan 2002 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Arthur Money, pp1 - 58

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Abstract

There is much to be learned from the study of history yet, as a form of research, historical studies have been largely overlooked by the IS community. It is argued that many current information systems can be best understood in terms of decisions taken in a particular temporal context and that by ignoring history, IS research is overlooking a powerful source of insights into the nature of such systems. Based on work in IS and from elsewhere, an outline for a historiographical research method in IS is presented and some issued related to this are discussed.

 

Keywords: Information Systems, History, Historiography, Interpretive Research

 

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Journal Article

Tell me a Story —A way to Knowledge  pp133-140

Dan Remenyi

© Nov 2005 Volume 3 Issue 2, Editor: Arthur Money, pp93 - 148

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Abstract

A narrative or a story (and these terms are synonyms) is a fundamental way of understanding our environment and relationships in it and thus it is a key feature of sound research whatever methodological approach has been taken. The skills of story telling are important in both qualitative or interpretive and quantitative research. But it comes into its own in qualitative research where story telling especially as it appears in case studies and action research is of prime importance. In quantitative research a story or narrative is also required to contextualize the work. The argument developed in this paper balances the idea that numerical analysis underpins the most powerful research paradigms.

 

Keywords: Story telling, narrative, qualitative research, quantitative research, rhetoric, argument

 

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Journal Article

Telling Tales: Storytelling as a Methodological Approach in Research  pp147-156

Tara Rooney, Katrina Lawlor, Eddie Rohan

© Nov 2016 Volume 14 Issue 2, Editor: Ann Brown, pp71 - 167

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Abstract

This paper describes the application of storytelling as a methodology in a consumer relationship context. A theoretical overview of Story as a unique narrative form is presented. The inquiry was conducted in the consumer banking sector using a blended narrative approach of storytelling and life history narratives. Research design was exploratory in nature and pursuant of an interpretivist perspective. The methodology applied Gabriel’s (2000) story classification taxonomy which categories stories based on epic, comic, tragic and romantic dimensions and follows the Beginning, Middle and End configuration (BME). Procedures used in this study are presented to serve as a guide for researchers interested in undertaking storytelling in the field of consumer and business research. We conclude that storytelling is a valuable methodology for exploring consumer relationships as it allows researchers to trace the evolution and development of the interaction by analysing the story typologies associated with each relationship phase. Finally, the paper reflects on the usefulness of this methodology in understanding and articulating consumer experiences.

 

Keywords: Story, Storytelling, Narrative, BME Framework, Narrative Interviewing, Relationships

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 3 Issue 2 / Nov 2005  pp93‑148

Editor: Arthur Money

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Keywords: Argument, Decision support, Delphi study, Evaluation, Model, Experience, Experiential learning, Frameworks, Information systems, Interpretive case study, IS design, Learning logs, Learning, Legitimisation, Narrative, Qualitative research, Quantitative research, Real-time data collection, Reflection, Research design, Research method, Research method, Rhetoric, Rules Simulation, Story telling, Web technology, electronic journal, papers, articles, research methods business studies, management studies

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 16 Issue 3 / Oct 2018  pp103‑172

Editor: Ann Brown

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Keywords: mixed methods, pragmatism, paradigm wars, abduction, empirical phenomenon, case studies, Academic development, research, university, significant research, publication, research, design, pragmatism, criticisms, bilingualism, New Caledonia, nickel mining, critical discourse analysis, Appreciative Inquiry, Organisational Change, Lean Management, World café, Story-telling, Participative Action Research.

 

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