The Electronic Journal of Business Research Methods provides perspectives on topics relevant to research in the field of business and management
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Journal Article

Promoting the case for Using a Research Journal to Document and Reflect on the Research Experience  pp84-92

David Lamb

© Dec 2013 Volume 11 Issue 2, ECRM 2013, Editor: Ann Brown, pp53 - 117

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper draws upon a personal research journey and makes the case for recording this experience using a research journal. tol The context for this paper is based on a study of family life and leisure, which collected data using more tradition al qualitative methods, namely focus groups and interviews with pre‑birth and post birth couples and leisure managers in New Zealand. The research design for this study was based on phenomenology, where the experience of the subjects being studied was sig nificant and involved developing an understanding of the lived experiences of pre‑birth and post‑birth couples, where the way they acted was dependent upon their understanding and meaning of their behavior (Waters, 1994) This paper draws on the research ers own reflections recorded in a research journal, whilst undertaking this research study over a five year period. The paper discusses the meaning and importance of reflection as a way of evaluating the researchers own research journey and highlights a number of issues with reference to the validity of such data. The paper concludes by revisiting the key benefits of reflection and affirms the belief that research journals are a useful tool, which enables the researcher to record personal thoughts and o bservations in a systematic manner.

 

Keywords: Keywords: personal, research journey, phenomenology, observing, writing, journal, reflection, y, qualitative research

 

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Journal Article

The Dimension of Time: Historiography in Information Systems Research  pp1-10

Frank Bannister

© Jan 2002 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Arthur Money, pp1 - 58

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Abstract

There is much to be learned from the study of history yet, as a form of research, historical studies have been largely overlooked by the IS community. It is argued that many current information systems can be best understood in terms of decisions taken in a particular temporal context and that by ignoring history, IS research is overlooking a powerful source of insights into the nature of such systems. Based on work in IS and from elsewhere, an outline for a historiographical research method in IS is presented and some issued related to this are discussed.

 

Keywords: Information Systems, History, Historiography, Interpretive Research

 

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Journal Article

Co‑operative Inquiry: Reflections on Practice  pp27-37

Briony J Oates

© Jan 2002 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Arthur Money, pp1 - 58

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Abstract

Co‑operative inquiry (CI) is a form of action research which emphasises participation. This paper discusses CI as a research methodology. An overview is given and then greater detail is provided using as a vehicle my use of CI in a particular research study. This study explored whether conventionally‑educated systems developers could adopt a richer model of organisations by using metaphors for organisations as cognitive structuring devices. Finally some reflections are given on the challenges CI poses for both individual researchers and the wider academic community.

 

Keywords: co-operative inquiry, information systems development, metaphors

 

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Journal Article

Towards an Informed Evaluation of Information Systems Services' Quality: The Development and Application of the Template Process  pp38-45

Mark NK Saunders, Christine S Williams

© Jan 2002 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Arthur Money, pp1 - 58

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Abstract

In this paper, we review literature on existing measures of service quality applicable to information systems services. We offer the Template Process as an alternative to more traditional methods, illustrating the process with findings from research into the quality of an IS service in a major UK Electronics company as perceived and expected by both service users and deliverers. We conclude with a discussion of the merits and shortcomings of the Template Process and suggestions for further research.

 

Keywords: Service Quality, Information Systems, Template Process

 

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Journal Article

Gender Reflexivity: A Missing Element from Action Research in Information Systems  pp50-58

Teresa Waring

© Jan 2002 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Arthur Money, pp1 - 58

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Abstract

Much of the literature on AR in IS appears to have forgotten its radical roots and its subjective epistemology. More rigorous, mechanistic approaches and control mechanisms are continuing to emerge rather than more insightful and innovative methods of interpretation and reflexivity to facilitate making sense of the research. AR is a methodology, like ethnography, that involves people and as such is subject to organisational power and politics that can have dimensions of age, race, social class as well as gender. This paper argues that action researchers involved in information systems development should become more critical in their approach and provide insight into their research by avoiding linguistic reductionism and sanitised stories that remove the struggle, conflict and injustice inherent in all organisations involved in change. This can be done in a variety of ways. One such approach is by developing and presenting stories that are interpreted through different lenses that reveal to the reader new dimensions in the research. The lens used in this paper is a gender lens.

 

Keywords: Action Research, Information Systems development

 

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Journal Article

A Critique of Using Grounded Theory as a Research Method  pp1-10

George Allan

© Jul 2003 Volume 2 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 77

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Abstract

Grounded Theory is a powerful research method for collecting and analysing research data. It was 'discovered' by Glaser & Strauss (1967) in the 1960s but is still not widely used or understood by researchers in some industries or PhD students in some science disciplines. This paper demonstrates the steps in the method and describes the difficulties encountered in applying Grounded Theory (GT). A fundamental part of the analysis method in GT is the derivation of codes, concepts and categories. Codes and coding are explained and illustrated in Section 3. Merging the codes to discover emerging concepts is a central part of the GT method and is shown in Section 4. Glaser and Strauss's constant comparison step is applied and illustrated so that the emerging categories can be seen coming from the concepts and leading to the emergent theory grounded in the data in Section 5. However, the initial applications of the GT method did have difficulties. Problems encountered when using the method are described to inform the reader of the realities of the approach. The data used in the illustrative analysis comes from recent ISIT Case Study research into configuration management (CM) and the use of commercially available computer products (COTS). Why and how the GT approach was appropriate is explained in Section 6. However, the focus is on reporting GT as a research method rather than the results of the Case Study.

 

Keywords: Grounded Theory, codes, concepts, emerging categories, emergent theory

 

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Journal Article

Gender disparity in organisation and the resultant human resource mismanagement: A case analysis  pp21-36

Ronald B. Crawford

© Jul 2003 Volume 2 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 77

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Abstract

This paper addresses 'gender disparity' in organisation. Using a multinational organisation, as a basis for data elicitation, the empirical analysis explores its human resource utilisation, on basis of gender, to assess parity of treatment. The research employs a combination of qualitative and quantitative data elicitation techniques. All comparative tables are chisquared, with probability taken at 'p<0.05'. The empirical data suggests that management, through its discriminatory practices, fail to adequately utilise its human resource, negatively affecting gender relationships and worker commitment, jeopardising overall organisational effectiveness.

 

Keywords: Gender disparity, human resource utilisation, committee membership, marketing intelligence, worker commitment, resonation

 

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Journal Article

Inductive theory generation: A grounded approach to business inquiry  pp37-44

David Douglas

© Jul 2003 Volume 2 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 77

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Abstract

Grounded theory has frequently been referred to, but infrequently applied in business research. This article addresses such a deficiency by advancing two focal aims. Firstly, it seeks to de‑mystify the methodology known as grounded theory by applying this established research practice within the comparatively new context of business research. Secondly, in so doing, it integrates naturalistic examples drawn from the author's business research, hence explicating the efficacy of grounded theory methodology in gaining deeper understanding of business bounded phenomena. It is from such a socially focused methodology that key questions of what is happening and why leads to the generation of substantive theories and underpinning knowledge.

 

Keywords: grounded theory methodology, qualitative, inductive, small business

 

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