The Electronic Journal of Business Research Methods provides perspectives on topics relevant to research in the field of business and management
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Journal Article

Applying a Behavioural Simulation for the Collection of Data  pp141-148

Kristina Risom Jespersen

© Nov 2005 Volume 3 Issue 2, Editor: Arthur Money, pp93 - 148

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Abstract

To collect real‑time data as opposed to retrospective data requires new methodological traits. One possibility is the use of behavioral simulations that synthesize the self‑administered questionnaire, experimental designs, role‑playing and scenarios. Supported by Web technology this new data collection methodology proves itself valid and with high appeal to respondents.

 

Keywords: real-time data collection, simulation, web technology

 

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Journal Article

Validation of Simulation Based Models: A Theoretical Outlook  pp39-46

Morvin Savio Martis

© Nov 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Arthur Money, pp1 - 66

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Abstract

Validation is the most incomprehensible part of developing a model. Nevetheless, no model can be accepted unless it has passed the tests of validation, since the procedure of validation is vital to ascertain the credibility of the model. Validation procedures are usually framework based and dynamic, but a methodical procedure can be followed by a modeller (researcher) in order to authenticate the model. The paper starts with a discussion on the views and burning issues by various researchers on model validation and the foundational terminology involved. The paper later highlights on the methodology and the process of validation adopted. Reasons for the failure of the model have also been explored. The paper finally focuses on the widely approved validation schemes (both quantitative and qualitative) and techniques in practice, since no one test can determine the credibility and validity of a simulation model. Moreover, as the model passes more tests (both quantitative and qualitative) the confidence in the model increases correspondingly.

 

Keywords: Validation, simulation, dynamic models, validation schemes, validation process, modelling

 

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Journal Article

Equidistance of Likert‑Type Scales and Validation of Inferential Methods Using Experiments and Simulations  pp16-28

Bjorn Lantz

© Jun 2013 Volume 11 Issue 1, Editor: Ann Brown, pp1 - 50

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Abstract

Likert‑type data are often assumed to be equidistant by applied researchers so that they can use parametric methods to analyse the data. Since the equidistance assumption rarely is tested, the validity of parametric analyses of Likert‑type data is often unclear. This paper consists of two parts where we deal with this validity problem in two different respects. In the first part, we use an experimental design to show that the perceived distance between scale points on a regular five‑point Likert‑type scale depends on how the verbal anchors are used. Anchors only at the end points create a relatively larger perceived distance between points near the ends of the scale than in the middle (end‑of‑scale effect), while anchors at all points create a larger perceived distance between points in the middle of the scale (middle‑of‑scale effect). Hence, Likert‑type scales are generally not perceived as equidistant by subjects. In the second part of the paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to explore how parametric methods commonly used to compare means between several groups perform in terms of actual significance and power when data are assumed to be equidistant even though they are not. The results show that the preferred statistical method to analyse Likert‑type data depends on the nature of their nonequidistance as well as their skewness. Under middle‑of‑scale effect, the omnibus one‑way ANOVA works best when data are relatively symmetric. However, the Kruskal‑Wallis test works better when data are skewed except when sample sizes are unequal, in which case the Brown‑Forsythe test is better. Under end‑of‑scale effect, on the other hand, the Kruskal‑Wallis test should be preferred in most cases when data are at most moderately skewed. When data are heavily skewed, ANOVA works best unless when sample sizes are unequal, in which case the Brown‑Forsythe test should be preferred.

 

Keywords: Likert-type scale; equidistance; Monte Carlo simulation; ANOVA; Kruskal-Wallis test; Brown-Forsythe test; Welch test

 

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Journal Article

The Impact of non‑Equidistance on Anova and Alternative Methods  pp16-26

Bjorn Lantz

© Jul 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, Editor: Ann Brown, pp1 - 74

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Abstract

Abstract: The normality assumption behind ANOVA and other parametric methods implies not only mound shape, symmetry, and zero excess kurtosis, but also that data are equidistant. This paper uses a simulation approach to explore the impact of non‑equidista nce on the performance of statistical methods commonly used to compare locations across several groups. These include the one‑way ANOVA and its robust alternatives, the Brown‑Forsythe test, and the Welch test. We show that non‑equidistance does affect the se methods with respect to both significance level and power, but the impact differs between the methods. In general, the ANOVA is less sensitive to non‑equidistance than the other two methods are and should therefore be the primary choice when analyzing potentially non‑equidistant data.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Likert-type scale, equidistance, Monte Carlo simulation, ANOVA

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 3 Issue 2 / Nov 2005  pp93‑148

Editor: Arthur Money

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Keywords: Argument, Decision support, Delphi study, Evaluation, Model, Experience, Experiential learning, Frameworks, Information systems, Interpretive case study, IS design, Learning logs, Learning, Legitimisation, Narrative, Qualitative research, Quantitative research, Real-time data collection, Reflection, Research design, Research method, Research method, Rhetoric, Rules Simulation, Story telling, Web technology, electronic journal, papers, articles, research methods business studies, management studies

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 4 Issue 1 / Nov 2006  pp1‑66

Editor: Arthur Money

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Editorial

"This new edition of EJBRM once again offers readers a range of interesting ideas concerning various options available to the academic researcher working in the business and management field of study.

With regards to research methodology the business and management field of study has much to offer the researcher in a number of respects. The first reason for this is that this field of study is so broad and so many interesting topics fall within its ambit. This is of course and advantage as well as a major challenge for the academics who work in this field of study. Different topics have different research methodology potentials and so researchers have much to choose from.

There is also the question of the fact that there is a stream of new and interesting ideas being generate as to how to tackle both new as well as well established research topics.

For this issue papers of topics such as ""Can methodological applications develop critical thinking?"" (Blackman and Benson), ""Getting the most from NUD•IST/Nvivo"" (Dean and Sharp), ""Applying Multidimensional Item Response Theory Analysis to a Measure of Meta‑Perspective Performance"" (Kacmar et al), ""A few proposals for designing and controlling a doctoral research project in management sciences"" (Lauriol), ""Validation of Simulation based Models: a Theoretical Outlook"" (Martis), ""Motivators for Australian consumers to search and shop online"" (Michael), ""A case study on the selection and evaluation of software for an Internet organisation"" (van Staaden and Lubbe) have been accepted.

I trust that readers will find these papers as interesting as I have."

 

Keywords: Black Box testing, business process, CAQDAS, coding and reporting, commercial software system, consumer behaviour, critical thinking, dynamic models, evaluation, internet, interpreting data transcription, item response theory, modeling motivating factors, NUD*IST/NVivo, qualitative research reporting, request for proposal (RFP), research methodology, scale development simulation, software, validation process, validation schemes, validation, vendors

 

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