The Electronic Journal of Business Research Methods provides perspectives on topics relevant to research in the field of business and management
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Journal Article

Towards a Second Order Research Methodology  pp25-36

Jim Brown, Petia Sice

© Sep 2005 Volume 3 Issue 1, Editor: Arthur Money, pp1 - 92

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Abstract

This paper addresses the need for re‑examining the cognitive perspective on the role of language in social research. From the autopoietic perspective, language is not a tool to reveal an objective world; rather language is a venue for action, coupling the cognitive domains of two or more agents. Responsible research enquiry would seek to create systemic communication practices that allow the co‑existence of differing understandings within. Creating a dialogue for exploring and emerging meaning is essential in developing understanding and validating the research results.

 

Keywords: autopoiesis, social systems, language, dialogue, research method, systems thinking

 

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Journal Article

A Generic Toolkit for the Successful Management of Delphi Studies  pp103-116

Jacqueline Day, Milena Bobeva

© Nov 2005 Volume 3 Issue 2, Editor: Arthur Money, pp93 - 148

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Abstract

This paper presents the case of a non‑traditional use of the Delphi method for theory evaluation. On the basis of experience gained through secondary and primary research, a generic decision toolkit for Delphi studies is proposed, comprising of taxonomy of Delphi design choices, a stage model and critical methodological decisions. These research tools will help to increase confidence when adopting the Delphi alternative and allow for a wider and more comprehensive recognition of the method within both scientific and interpretivist studies.

 

Keywords: Research method, Delphi, Research Design, Research Evaluation

 

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Journal Article

Learning Logs: Assessment or Research Method?  pp117-122

Tim Friesner, Mike Hart

© Nov 2005 Volume 3 Issue 2, Editor: Arthur Money, pp93 - 148

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Abstract

Learning logs are an increasingly popular mode assessment. They record learning, experience and reflection. This paper considers learning logs as a research method, where researchers wish to gain a deep understanding of the processes of learning, reflection and experience as they occur in individuals over a period of time. Techniques are offered for implementing logs as a research method, analysing the data and interpreting results.

 

Keywords: Learning logs, research method, reflection, learning, experiential learning, experience

 

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Journal Article

A Strategy for Delayed Research Method Selection: Deciding Between Grounded Theory and Phenomenology  pp35-46

Sebastian Reiter

© Jan 2011 Volume 9 Issue 1, ECRM 2010 Special issue Part 2/Jan 2011, Editor: Ann Brown, David Douglas, Marian Carcary and Jose Esteves, pp1 - 87

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Abstract

TThis paper presents a strategy for delayed research method selection in a qualitative interpretivist research. An exemplary case details how explorative interviews were designed and conducted in accordance with a paradigm prior to deciding whether to adopt grounded theory or phenomenology for data analysis. The focus here is to determine the most appropriate research strategy in this case the methodological framing to conduct research and represent findings, both of which are detailed. Research addressing current management issues requires both a flexible framework and the capability to consider the research problem from various angles, to derive tangible results for academia with immediate application to business demands. Researchers, and in particular novices, often struggle to decide on an appropriate research method suitable to address their research problem. This often applies to interpretative qualitative research where it is not always immediately clear which is the most appropriate method to use, as the research objectives shift and crystallize over time. This paper uses an exemplary case to reveal how the strategy for delayed research method selection contributes to deciding whether to adopt grounded theory or phenomenology in the initial phase of a PhD research project. In this case, semi‑structured interviews were used for data generation framed in an interpretivist approach, situated in a business context. Research questions for this study were thoroughly defined and carefully framed in accordance with the research paradigm’s principles, while at the same time ensuring that the requirements of both potential research methods were met. The grounded theory and phenomenology methods were compared and contrasted to determine their suitability and whether they meet the research objectives based on a pilot study. The strategy proposed in this paper is an alternative to the more ‘traditional’ approach, which initially selects the methodological formulation, followed by data generation. In conclusion, the suggested strategy for delayed research method selection intends to help researchers identify and apply the most appropriate method to their research. This strategy is based on explorations of data generation and analysis in order to derive faithful results from the data generated.

 

Keywords: research method selection, qualitative research, grounded theory, phenomenology

 

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Journal Article

Eating our own Cooking: Toward a More Rigorous Design Science of Research Methods  pp141-153

John Venable, Richard Baskerville

© Dec 2012 Volume 10 Issue 2, ECRM, Editor: Ann Brown, pp53 - 153

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Abstract

This paper argues that Design Science is an appropriate paradigm for research into Research Methods. Research Methods (along with their tools and techniques) are purposeful artefacts, designed and created by people to achieve a specific purpose – i.e. to create new, truthful knowledge. Like other artefacts, research methods vary in their fitness to purpose, i.e. in their utility, depending on their fit and appropriate application to the particular purpose, contexts, and contingencies for which they were developed. Design Science Research aims at developing new purposeful artefacts with evidence of their utility. Applying a DSR perspective to research methods should yield increased utility in the application of research methods, better guidance in applying them and greater confidence in achieving the desired outcomes of applying them. Based on these premises, this paper reviews the basic concerns and issues in Design Science Research (using the balanced scorecard as an example purposeful artefact), then analyses the logical consequences of taking a Design Science perspective on research methods (using the Partial Least Square approach as an example research method purposeful artefact). First, it analyses the various purposes of research methods to clarify the alternative and competing design goals of research methods. Second, it analyses and characterises the types of purposeful (design) artefacts that comprise research methods. Third, it considers issues of the evaluation of research methods. Fourth and finally, it considered the development of design theories of research methods.

 

Keywords: research method, research design, design science research, evaluation, design theory, research rigour

 

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Journal Article

Low Cost Text Mining as a Strategy for Qualitative Researchers  pp2-16

Jeremy Rose, Christian Lennerholt

© Apr 2017 Volume 15 Issue 1, Editor: Ann Brown, pp1 - 56

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Abstract

Advances in text mining together with the widespread adoption of the Internet have opened up new possibilities for qualitative researchers in the information systems and business and management fields. Easy access to large amounts of textual material through search engines, combined with automated techniques for analysis, promise to simplify the process of qualitative research. In practice this turns out not to be so easy. We outline a design research approach for building a five stage process for low tech, low cost text mining, which includes insights from the text mining literature and an experiment with trend analysis in business intelligence. We summarise the prototype process, and discuss the many difficulties that currently stand in the way of high quality research by this route. Despite the difficulties, the combination of low cost text mining with qualitative research is a promising methodological avenue, and we specify some future paths for this area of study.

 

Keywords: big data, business intelligence, qualitative research method, social media analysis, text mining, text analytics

 

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Journal Article

Increasing business students' Confidence in Questioning the Validity and Reliability of their Research  pp67-76

Teresa Smallbone, Sarah Quinton

© Jul 2003 Volume 2 Issue 2, Editor: Arthur Money, pp47 - 170

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Abstract

Business students like to think that their research is of practical value but rarely have the confidence to question the validity of the data they have collected. Teachers expect that students will demonstrate a critical awareness of the limits of their own and others' research. The paper outlines different ways of teaching students how to recognise the key issues surrounding validity and reliability and how to make generalizations from their research.

 

Keywords: business, research methods, validity, reliability, teaching, learning

 

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Journal Article

Can Methodological Applications Develop Critical Thinking?  pp1-10

Deborah Blackman, Angela Benson

© Nov 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Arthur Money, pp1 - 66

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Abstract

This paper outlines how using research methods to develop critical thinking was explored in a workshop and then developed into a curriculum. An exercise showed how diverse methodologies led to different answers, which were explored to consider the nature of knowledge itself and the subsequent implications. The paper concludes that such an approach can (a) develop critical thinking skills at a level of deep, rather than surface learning and (b) effectively challenge some preconceived ideas held by students about how knowledge is developed and shared. The crucial element of success was the design and implementation of the assessment.

 

Keywords: Critical thinking, research methodology, learning, knowledge

 

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