The Electronic Journal of Business Research Methods provides perspectives on topics relevant to research in the field of business and management
For general enquiries email administrator@ejbrm.com
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop
Information about The European Conference on Research Methodology for Business and Management Studies is available here

linkedin-120 

 

twitter2-125 

 

fb_logo-125 

 

Journal Article

Hypermodernist Travellers in a Postmodern World  pp1-8

Peter M. Bednar, Christine Welch

© Sep 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, ECRM 2008, Editor: Ann Brown, pp1 - 94

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

As travellers, we are usually aware that a map is not the territory it represents. However, as researchers, inquiring into practice, are we always aware of the domain within which that practice is situated? Descriptions of practice sometimes suggest that this is not the case. For example, do engineers actually believe that the models they develop and use are reflections of some reality? It is likely that an engineer never actually follows his models when developing an artefact or process. Similarly, we can ask ourselves whether we believe that a chef actually cooks by following a recipe. Possibly, only someone who does not know how to cook would think so. These idealised models are simply the basis for discussionreflection and experimentation. It is sometimes the case, however, that descriptions of practice are produced based in a kind of rationality that suggests these misapprehensions are appropriate. In the context of research, can we say that postmodernism has any relevance? If, in the field of practice, only the uninitiated ever had illusions that the 'grand theories' of 'modernism' could be directly applicable, then informed research must recognize this also. To those with no illusions, such 'grand theories' were a basis for reflection and critique. Thus, to this extent we have always been 'modern' and still are. Rather than espousing a Postmodernist perspective, we might point to 'Hypermodernism' — a recognition that the 'grand theories' can only be used as metaphors, i.e. a basis for practical philosophy. By adopting such a stance, it is possible to avoid a false step of fighting 'straw men' and dismissing as worthless research that which could be useful material for reflection and learning when juxtaposed with other perspectives on practice. Models and explanatory frameworks within which research has been conducted need not be rejected as 'modernist' if there is recognition of their useful role as metaphor. At the same time, we suggest a need for a critically‑informed approach to research which sheds light upon taken‑for‑granted assumptions and naïve rationalities, illuminating metaphor and stimulating reflection.

 

Keywords: metaphor, reflective practice, postmodernism, critical systemic thinking, contextual inquiry

 

Share |

Journal Article

The Effect of Misspecification of Reflective and Formative Constructs in Operations and Manufacturing Management Research  pp34-52

Subhadip Roy, Monideepa Tarafdar, T.S. Ragu-Nathan, Erica Marsillac

© Jan 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, Editor: Ann Brown, pp1 - 52

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This paper highlights theoretical and mathematical differences between formative and reflective measurement models, in the context of academic SEM oriented research in Operations and Manufacturing Management, an area of significant current interest. It discusses problems associated with measurement model misspecification. It further illustrates, using survey data, the effects of possible misspecification on model fit parameters and path coefficients in a nomological model, using the Partial Least Squares (PLS) approach. It then proposes guidelines for the use of the PLS methodology for analyzing formative measurement models.

 

Keywords: formative, reflective, measurement models, PLS, structural equation modeling, model misspecification

 

Share |

Journal Article

Reflection‑in‑Addition: Using Reflective logs to Build Research into Undergraduate Projects  pp85-93

Martin Rich

© Jan 2015 Volume 13 Issue 2, ECRM 2015, Editor: Ann Brown, pp63 - 93

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: This paper explores the scope for using reflective logs as a component in final year projects taken by students on an undergraduate management course. Students often wish to build practical experience into the final year of their degree, but th ey are also expected to carry out a certain amount of independent research as part of a final year. There can be a tension between students⠒ desire for experience and the requirement for research. The context of this is a management degree where a sig nificant piece of independent work is regarded as a crucial component of the course, but where an unintended consequence of framing this piece of work in a way that encourages autonomy among students, is that there is some ambiguity about quite what stude nts are expected to deliver. An observation made by some of the markers of these projects is that it is not uncommon for them to read like good consultancy reports, which do demonstrate the students⠒ writing skills and often prepare them for their futu re careers, but which do not necessarily score highly against the criteria associated with a major academic piece of work. Within the author⠒s institution some thought has been given to providing alternative forms of project, and a tangible move in this direction has been to introduce an option where some students combine their project with working alongside an organisation on a practical task. For these students an integral part of the process is the requirement that they maintain a reflective log on their work, following the principles of Schon (1983) in framing and reframing questions to elicit knowledge based on the students⠒ experience. One interpretation of this is that the reflective log can constitute part of the primary data that the stud ents draw on in their research. Such an approach has clear attractions for students and academic supervisors alike. There are well defined formats which a reflective log can follow and which can foster experiential learning (Moon, 2004). Because this type of project is based on practical activities

 

Keywords: Keywords: Reflective practice, projects, observation

 

Share |

Journal Article

A Model for Improving Knowledge Generation in Design Science Research through Reflective Practice  pp192-211

J.T. Janse van Rensburg, Roelien Goede

© Dec 2019 Volume 17 Issue 4, Editor: Ann Brown, pp192 - 243

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Epistemology refers to the philosophy of knowledge and aims to address central questions of how we create new knowledge. All research paradigms can be distinguished in terms of epistemological assumptions, that is, assumptions of how knowledge is produced in the respective paradigms. Design science research (DSR) is a research paradigm often used in technical disciplines for the creation of artefacts. DSR has roots in pragmatism, where beliefs and theories are evaluated based on the success of its practical application. New knowledge is produced in DSR when original artefacts are created to solve a problem. The epistemological assumption of DSR can then shortly be defined as ‘knowledge through making’. At its core, DSR is goal‑orientated and its practical approaches are focused on delivering the product according to straight‑forward processes ‑ without being affected by human factors. This process of acquiring new knowledge is efficient but not necessarily effective in terms of capturing all aspects of the experience of the practitioner. Frameworks exist for the creation of artefacts in DSR, but the process of knowledge generation is not explicit. The aim of the paper is to guide explicit knowledge generation in DSR. The research question is “How can we make the process of obtaining knowledge in DSR more explicit?” DSR Frameworks are iterative in nature and focus on the creation and evaluation of artefacts. There is an implicit assumption that reflection takes place in these iterations. Schön, author of The Reflective Practitioner, writes that new knowledge is produced through reflection during and after an event has occurred. He also states that you can only have a complete understanding of a problem through the dual process of reflection‑in‑action and reflection‑on‑action. We argue that this also holds true for artefact design and development in DSR. A reflective DSR practitioner can explicitly indicate how knowledge is produced in the design science research cycle. The effective use of reflective practice changes each individual phase of a DSR framework from goal‑orientated to problem‑orientated. Epistemologically, knowledge is then produced through ‘learning by doing’, which gives DSR a worldview that supports reflective practice. The paper promotes the incorporation of reflective practice in DSR and provides a demonstration thereof in an example on the preparation of IT students for their chosen career.

 

Keywords: Design science research, reflective practice, epistemology, knowledge generation

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 17 Issue 4 / Dec 2019  pp192‑243

Editor: Ann Brown

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Keywords: Design science research, reflective practice, epistemology, knowledge generation, Activity Theory, contradictions, analysis of qualitative data, technology-mediated organisational change, Accounting Information Systems, Information Security Management, participative action research, case study, Participatory Action Research (PAR), business simulation, education, qualitative research, quantitative research, methodology

 

Share |