The Electronic Journal of Business Research Methods provides perspectives on topics relevant to research in the field of business and management
For general enquiries email administrator@ejbrm.com
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop
Information about The European Conference on Research Methodology for Business and Management Studies is available here

linkedin-120 

 

twitter2-125 

 

fb_logo-125 

 

Journal Article

Applying a Behavioural Simulation for the Collection of Data  pp141-148

Kristina Risom Jespersen

© Nov 2005 Volume 3 Issue 2, Editor: Arthur Money, pp93 - 148

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

To collect real‑time data as opposed to retrospective data requires new methodological traits. One possibility is the use of behavioral simulations that synthesize the self‑administered questionnaire, experimental designs, role‑playing and scenarios. Supported by Web technology this new data collection methodology proves itself valid and with high appeal to respondents.

 

Keywords: real-time data collection, simulation, web technology

 

Share |

Journal Article

Using Plenary Focus Groups in Information Systems Research: More than a Collection of Interviews  pp209-216

Polly Sobreperez

© Nov 2008 Volume 6 Issue 2, Editor: Ann Brown, pp123 - 216

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Qualitative techniques for the collection of empirical materials are classically identified as including interviews and observations. However a further technique has more recently emerged known as the group interview or focus group, which may be applicable only to certain types of research situation but is widely overlooked and can add a level of knowledge and richness not available through other techniques. This paper follows the growth of focus group research, looks for situations in Information Systems research where this technique gives unique insights, and describes the conduct and application of the technique in a case study setting. An example of a useful structuring technique is described and conclusions are drawn concerning a particular type of focus group in information systems qualitative research which may well be useful in other research scenarios.

 

Keywords: research instrument, focus groups, data collection, empirical technique

 

Share |

Journal Article

Challenges of Multicultural Data Collection and Analysis: Experiences From the Health Information System Research  pp75-82

Reetta Raitoharju, Eeva Heiro, Ranjan Kini, Martin D'Cruz

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, ECRM 2009, Editor: Ann Brown, Joseph Azzopardi, Frank Bezzina, pp1 - 116

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The effect of culture has been popular topic in recent information system research. However, it is not a simple task to either collect or analyze data containing elements of "culture". This paper presents previous literature on how to measure culture, the theoretical background how to build this construct and a short description of empirical study we conducted in a multicultural environment. Our research topic was to examine the usage of health information exchange systems in two different kinds of healthcare sectors (i.e. Finland and USA). Finally we reflect on our experiences both in collecting data as well as in analyzing it through the lenses of cultural differences. Strengths and weaknesses of multicultural data collection are discussed together with opportunities and threats of analyzing data with the purpose of finding cultural elements.

 

Keywords: multicultural data collection, information systems, health care professionals, interview, focus groups

 

Share |

Journal Article

The use of Grounded Theory Technique as a Practical Tool for Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis  pp29-40

Japhet Lawrence, Usman Tar

© Jun 2013 Volume 11 Issue 1, Editor: Ann Brown, pp1 - 50

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

When encountering qualitative research for the first time, one is confronted with both the number of methods and the difficulty of collecting, analysing and presenting large amounts of data. In quantitative research, it is possible to make a clear distinction between gathering and analysing data. However, this distinction is not clear‑cut in qualitative research. The objective of this paper is to provide insight for the novice researcher and the experienced researcher coming to grounded theory for the first time. For those who already have experience in the use of the method the paper provides further much needed discussion arising out of the method’s adoption in the IS field. In this paper the authors present a practical application and illustrate how grounded theory method was applied to an interpretive case study research. The paper discusses grounded theory method and provides guidance for the use of the method in interpretive studies.

 

Keywords: grounded theory, interpretive, case study, data collection, data analysis, qualitative, quantitative

 

Share |

Journal Article

A Reflection on Intercept Survey Use in Thailand: Some Cultural Considerations for Transnational Studies  pp60-70

Chanchai Phonthanukitithaworn, Carmine Sellitto

© Sep 2016 Volume 14 Issue 1, Editor: Ann Brown, pp1 - 70

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: How people respond to research surveys has been of long standing interest to investigators. In this paper, we reflect on our experiences in using the intercept survey as part of a study that examined m‑payment in Thailand. The paper does not report the findings of the original m‑payment study, but highlights how the cultural features of the target population were an important consideration at the survey translation, pilot testing and data collection stages. We propose that cultural features such as face‑to‑face interaction, the intrinsic notion of politeness (Kreng Jai) and conveying respect to potential participants (giving the Wai) as significant elements in achieving a relatively high participation rate. Survey translation occurred via mo derated discussions where the cultural dimensions of collectivism and personal status (relevant in high PDI societies) were observed to influence group dynamics. In the field, the intercept survey promoted direct engagement with people (preferred amongst collectivism cultures), with respondents observed to be highly considerate of investigator needs and thus more likely to participate in the study.The papers contribution is one of highlighting the importance of considering national culture in the initial survey translation stage and later when collecting data in the field. Although a reflective piece, we believe that the findings have the potential to inform and assist researchers to improve the quality of their survey instruments and data responses in similar cultural settings.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Culture, intercept survey, Hofstede, Thailand, data collection, methodology, Kreng Jai, The Wai

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 3 Issue 2 / Nov 2005  pp93‑148

Editor: Arthur Money

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Keywords: Argument, Decision support, Delphi study, Evaluation, Model, Experience, Experiential learning, Frameworks, Information systems, Interpretive case study, IS design, Learning logs, Learning, Legitimisation, Narrative, Qualitative research, Quantitative research, Real-time data collection, Reflection, Research design, Research method, Research method, Rhetoric, Rules Simulation, Story telling, Web technology, electronic journal, papers, articles, research methods business studies, management studies

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 7 Issue 1, ECRM 2009 / Dec 2009  pp1‑116

Editor: Ann Brown, Joseph Azzopardi, Frank Bezzina

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Editorial

The 8th European Conference on Research Methods in Business and Management attracted a wide range of papers. The conference fell naturally into four main themes: introducing relatively new techniques, in depth description of application of accepted research methods, overview of the whole research process and attempts to deal with intractable problems. The final selection of papers was agreed both the editor of the Journal and the editors of the conference proceedings, Joseph Azzopardi and Frank Bezzina. The comments of session chairs were taken into account in making the final selection of papers for this issue of the EJBRM.

The quality of the papers was particularly high and the selection of those papers for the Journal presented a difficult choice. The papers selected were chosen for their quality of writing, their relevance to the Journal’s objective of publishing papers that offer new insights or practical help in the application of research methods in business research and to represent the four major themes of the conference.

The papers dealt with the problems facing management researchers in a variety of ways. The papers proposed a number on new and unusual methods, including Psychogeography ( Knowles) and webometrics (Romero‑Frias). Both of these papers focused on explaining the technique and its appropriateness to business research. Techniques dealt with in previous issues were also well represented including mixed methods (Ryan); Grounded Theory (Noel & Kamyangale); REP Grid (Klaus). Several papers offered some valuable insights into key steps of the research process including audit trail (Carcary) and data collection problems and interpretation ( Iacono, Brown and Holtham; Rasmussen, and Heiko; Heiro and Reetta). The paper by Brooke and Parker introduced a new dimension (spirituality) to the philosophy of business research. One paper offered an intriguing review of leadership research (Mortimer).

 

Keywords: brand identity, brand personality, business intelligence, business management, business survey, critical management, essential self, fact-based, feminist research methods, focus groups, Foucault, grounded theory, health care professionals, higher education, information systems, information technology, internet studies, interpretivist paradigm, interview, leadership theory, London, longitudinal case work, luxury brand, meaning and work, methodology, multicultural data collection, nonresponse, organisations, organisations audit trail, organizational culture, participant observation, philosophy, Protestant Ethic, psychogeography, qualitative data, qualitative online research, qualitative research, qualitative research methods, regional development, religion, Repertory Grid Method, research confirmability, trustworthiness, research design, research methods , research strategies, safety in the field, self-selection, SMEs, spirituality, steel trading case, transferability, Web 2.0, Web minin

 

Share |