The Electronic Journal of Business Research Methods provides perspectives on topics relevant to research in the field of business and management
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Journal Article

Motivators for Australian Consumers to Search and Shop Online  pp47-56

Ian Michael

© Nov 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Arthur Money, pp1 - 66

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Abstract

This paper investigates the factors that motivate Australian consumers to use the Internet to search and shop for products and services. A qualitative research method was used, utilizing a semi‑structured, in‑depth interview technique. Twenty in‑depth interviews were conducted, using a snowball sampling method. The study found that there were six motivating factors that drew consumers to search and shop online for products and services. These factors include: convenience, saving time, cheaper prices along with the ability to compare prices, good place to shop for specialty and hard‑to‑access products, higher level of consumer control, and the ease of comparing products and services.

 

Keywords: Motivating factors, Internet, consumer behaviour, search, shop, online

 

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Journal Article

The Application of Mixed Methods in Organisational Research: A Literature Review  pp95-105

Jose Molina Azorin, Roslyn Cameron

© Dec 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECRM Special Issue Part 1, Editor: Ann Brown, David Douglas, Marian Carcary and Jose Esteves, pp63 - 162

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Abstract

Mixed methods research (the combined use of quantitative and qualitative methods in the same study) is becoming an increasingly popular approach in the discipline fields of sociology, psychology, education and health sciences. Calls for the integration of quantitative and qualitative research methods have been advanced in these fields. A key feature of mixed methods research is its methodological pluralism, which frequently results in research which provides broader perspectives than those offered by monomethod designs. The overall purpose and central premise of mixed methods is that the use of quantitative and qualitative approaches in combination provides a better understanding of research problems and complex phenomena than either approach alone. Despite calls for the combined use of quantitative and qualitative research in business and management studies, the use of mixed methods in business and management has seldom been studied. The purpose of this paper is to review the application of mixed methods research within organisational research. The study reported in this paper identifies the use of mixed methods in three organisational journals for the period 2003 to 2009: the Strategic Management Journal, Journal of Organizational Behavior and Organizational Research Methods. The landmark Tashakkori and Teddlie (2003) Handbook of mixed methods in social and behavioral research, played a pivotal role in providing both the visibility and credibility of mixed methods as a third methodological movement and since the publication of this seminal work the mixed methods movement has rapidly gained popularity. Business and management researchers need to be made aware of the growing use and acceptance of mixed methods research across business and organisational journals. This paper examines the main characteristics of mixed methods studies identified in the sample in terms of purposes and designs, and posits suggestions on the application of mixed methodologies.

 

Keywords: mixed methods research, strategic management, organizational behaviour, quantitative methods, qualitative methods

 

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Journal Article

e‑Surveying and Respondent Behaviour: Insights from the Public Procurement Field  pp38-53

Anthony Flynn

© Mar 2018 Volume 16 Issue 1, Editor: Ann Brown, pp1 - 54

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Abstract

e‑Surveys have emerged as among the most widely used methods of collecting primary data from firms. In spite of their prevalence we know relatively little about how firms react to them. This paper takes a closer look at respondent behaviour during the e‑survey process by analysing data from 4747 suppliers. Among the key findings are a low rate of response, fast response times and a preference for submitting responses between 08.00 and 11.00. In terms of survey completeness, respondents answered 35 of the 48 survey questions, on average, and spent approximately seven minutes doing so. The time of day at which the response was submitted and the date of response was significant in explaining survey completeness. So too was firm size and nationality. Notably, the smaller the supplier the more complete the survey response. The implications of these findings for e‑surveying in the management field are discussed within.

 

Keywords: Survey, behaviour, response rate, procurement, suppliers.

 

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Journal Article

Wasting Time: The Mission Impossible with Respect to Technology‑Oriented Security Approaches  pp117-124

Andreas Wagner, Carole Brooke

© Jul 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, ECRM 2007, Editor: Ann Brown, pp37 - 124

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Abstract

Security is still too orientated towards technology and behavioural aspects are under prioritized. Organisations focus on the ability of technology to minimise risks. This paper as a preliminary research of a PhD thesis will argue that this assumption and approach is misguided, so we will focus on how a critical approach is more useful to exposing these issues. The key to secure systems is employees' perception and the action they take in accordance with the learned and perceived need for an understanding of compliance. The paper is about critical approaches to research and it just happens to be information and communication technology (ICT) that is the subject area.

 

Keywords: critical research, ICT security, organizational misbehaviour, learning, compliance

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 4 Issue 1 / Nov 2006  pp1‑66

Editor: Arthur Money

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Editorial

"This new edition of EJBRM once again offers readers a range of interesting ideas concerning various options available to the academic researcher working in the business and management field of study.

With regards to research methodology the business and management field of study has much to offer the researcher in a number of respects. The first reason for this is that this field of study is so broad and so many interesting topics fall within its ambit. This is of course and advantage as well as a major challenge for the academics who work in this field of study. Different topics have different research methodology potentials and so researchers have much to choose from.

There is also the question of the fact that there is a stream of new and interesting ideas being generate as to how to tackle both new as well as well established research topics.

For this issue papers of topics such as ""Can methodological applications develop critical thinking?"" (Blackman and Benson), ""Getting the most from NUD•IST/Nvivo"" (Dean and Sharp), ""Applying Multidimensional Item Response Theory Analysis to a Measure of Meta‑Perspective Performance"" (Kacmar et al), ""A few proposals for designing and controlling a doctoral research project in management sciences"" (Lauriol), ""Validation of Simulation based Models: a Theoretical Outlook"" (Martis), ""Motivators for Australian consumers to search and shop online"" (Michael), ""A case study on the selection and evaluation of software for an Internet organisation"" (van Staaden and Lubbe) have been accepted.

I trust that readers will find these papers as interesting as I have."

 

Keywords: Black Box testing, business process, CAQDAS, coding and reporting, commercial software system, consumer behaviour, critical thinking, dynamic models, evaluation, internet, interpreting data transcription, item response theory, modeling motivating factors, NUD*IST/NVivo, qualitative research reporting, request for proposal (RFP), research methodology, scale development simulation, software, validation process, validation schemes, validation, vendors

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 8 Issue 2, ECRM Special Issue Part 1 / Dec 2010  pp63‑162

Editor: Ann Brown, David Douglas, Marian Carcary, Jose Esteves

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Editorial

Introduction to the ECRM conference issues

The subject of research methods in business is showing an extraordinary level of activity and innovation and this conference (the 9th European Conference on Research Methods in Business and Management) reflected this. Papers ranged from those offering insight and help in applying such favorite methods as Grounded Theory (Douglas and Nunes et al) to those introducing new ideas such as the application of subtextual phenomenology (Valleck). Papers fell naturally into fourteen main themes and these formed the basis of the conference streams. The quality of the papers was of such a high level that it was decided to publish two conference issues, A & B.  Issue A has the best papers on: Grounded Theory, Mixed Methods, Reflecting and Researching one’s own professional practice, Research Methods in Business and Research Methods in Strategy‑as‑practice. Issue B has the best papers on: Qualitative Data Analysis, Research Methodology and methodology issues, Teaching Research Methods and Methodologies and Trust and Ethics

The final selection of papers was agreed by the senior editor of the Journal and the guest editors. The comments of session chairs were taken into account in making the final selection of papers for these two issues of the EJBRM. The papers selected were chosen for their quality of writing, their relevance to the Journal’s objective of publishing papers that offer new insights or practical help in the application of research methods in business research.

Issue A

These papers dealt with the problems facing management researchers in a variety of ways. Two papers develop new ideas (Valleck, Venkateswaran and Prabhu). Vallek’s paper introduces a relatively new method for researching in that it advocates the use of personal experience through the application of subtextual phenomenology (Valleck). The paper by Venkateswaran and Prabhu claim that their topic ‑ strategy‑as‑Practice is just emerging as a new subject. This is the study of individual and organizational actions in the process of strategizing. The paper gives an insightful view of the problems of taking a holistic view of such actions. The two papers on Grounded Theory could not have been more different in their aims, one (Douglas) shows us how the method can be used to identify the differing perspectives of stakeholders, while the second (Nunes et al) offers a valuable insight into managing the key initial stage of the method through the use of pilot studies. The papers on mixed methods (Papadimitriou, Molina‑Azorin and Cameron) both offer insight into how and when to use this method. Papadimitriou is a helpful paper to others in understanding the MMs approach to research. Whereas Molina‑Azorin and Cameron carry out a survey of the way Mixed methods has been applied in a number of key organizational research journals. The remaining three papers offer valuable insights into key steps of the research process: O'hEocha et al give a review of the use of focus groups from the literature which offers us insight into the value and appropriateness of using this technique. Heine uses an example of analyzing the behavior of a niche group to discuss the twin problems of surveys – that of reaching the target group and then motivating them to respond.  Beck et al address the practical problems of making use of data (on major change projects) over which the researcher has little control as to choice or the conditions within which the collection takes place.

 

Keywords: grounded theory, small business, entrepreneurship, pilot studies, context, research design, multilevel mixed design, quality management, higher education, neo-institutional theory, mixed methods research, strategic management, organizational behaviour, quantitative methods, qualitative methods, subtextual phenomenology; phenomenology; arts-based research; first-person research, transcendental phenomenology, intuitive research, focus group, information systems development, evaluation criteria, luxury products, luxury brands, luxury consumers, survey participant acquisition, survey response, viral marketing, field research, external validity, induction, statistical generalization, theoretical generalization, strategy-as-practice, research methods, strategy research, clinical research, review

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 16 Issue 1 / Mar 2018  pp1‑54

Editor: Ann Brown

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Editorial

 

Keywords: Indexes, methodological issues, negative denominators, ratios, research methodology, Case-Study Method, Key Informants, Different Voices, Cumulative Cultural Text, Representation Theory, Interviewee Reviews, and Constructed Public Understanding, Survey, behaviour, response rate, procurement, suppliers

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 5 Issue 2, ECRM 2007 / Jul 2007  pp37‑124

Editor: Ann Brown

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Editorial

The 5th European Conference on Research Methods in Business and Management attracted a wide range of papers. The conference fell naturally into a number of key themes organized into mini tracks. These included a number of different methods (Action research, Grounded Theory, Ethnography), specific issues (Teaching Research Methods) and philosophical paradigms (Critical approaches to research). A strong sub theme within all tracks was the concern with the complex problems that business and management research poses. The quality of the papers was high and the selection of those papers for the Journal presented a difficult choice. The papers selected were chosen for their quality of writing and relevance to the Journal’s objective of publishing papers that offer new insights or practical help in the application of research methods in business research.

The papers deal with the problems facing management researchers in a variety of ways. Most papers focus on the problems of applying research qualitative methods. The papers by Chester et al, Gehrels, Rodon and Pastor, and Vasconcelos all present case examples analysed from an interpretivist view using methods like Action Research and Grounded Theory Methods. Several papers confront the ambiguity and conflict inherent in researching people and their actions as they carry out their jobs (Mendy, Wagner and Brooke). The teaching research mini track was received with particular enthusiasm and one of the chosen papers is from this group (Sayce). A few papers adopt a traditional positivist stance creating new constructs (Schutz et al; Phillips and Phillips).

 

Keywords: action diagrams, arenas/social worlds theory, assessment, case study, coding paradigm, compliance, critical research, deep learning, discourse analysis, driving powers, epistemology, grounded theory, grounded theory, hospitality management curricula, ICT security, information systems adaptation, international students, inter-organizational IS implementation, language, learning, methodological dilemmas, mini-viva, organizational misbehaviour, performance assessment, performance constructs, print-catalogs, public transit, research methods, stakeholder, Straussian approach, theory and practice, transit performance, upper segment restaurants, usability scale implementation, value systems, verbal protocols

 

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