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Journal Article

The Development of an Evaluation Framework for Partnership Working  pp1-10

Maurice Atkinson

© Sep 2005 Volume 3 Issue 1, Editor: Arthur Money, pp1 - 92

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Abstract

This paper describes the outcomes of the "Action Planning" stage of an action research project utilising a search conference for the purposes of organisational development. The aim of the project was the design of a methodology to facilitate the evaluation of the complexities of working in partnership and to assess the extent to which collaboration actually adds value in terms of both process and outcomes. The research centred on multi‑agency partnership working within Children's Services Planning (CSP) in the Southern Health and Social Services Board's area in Northern Ireland. The resulting evaluation framework contains seven interconnected dimensions with associated sub‑ dimensions and assessment criteria. The framework is underpinned by the concept of a virtuous circle formed by evaluation, learning, improvement, measurement, and back to evaluation.

 

Keywords: Evaluation, evaluation framework, partnership working, collaboration, action research, Children's Services Planning, Health and Personal Social Service

 

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Journal Article

Active Exploration of Emerging Themes in a Study of Object‑Oriented Requirements Engineering: The "Evolutionary Case" Approach  pp29-42

Linda Dawson

© Sep 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, ECRM 2008, Editor: Ann Brown, pp1 - 94

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Abstract

The evolutionary case approach provides a framework for qualitative case study research in information systems (IS). It uses revelation, reinforcement, reflection and re‑examination to explicitly explore emerging themes in interpretive case study research. The method is based on the progressive development of a theoretical model grounded initially in the literature and then refined using sequential case studies grounded in practice. The method addresses the gap which often separates data from conclusions in qualitative case study research by documenting the "revealed" and "reinforced" changes in the theoretical model as it evolves from the empirical data. The paper provides an illustrative study of the use of models in object‑oriented requirements engineering to demonstrate the use of the evolutionary case approach.

 

Keywords: Case study, action research, qualitative, object-oriented, requirements engineering

 

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Journal Article

Action Research: Intertwining three exploratory processes to meet the competing demands of rigour and relevance  pp111-124

Gertjan Schuiling, Derk Jan Kiewiet

© Nov 2016 Volume 14 Issue 2, Editor: Ann Brown, pp71 - 167

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Abstract

For decades, scholars have questioned whether it is possible to conduct research that is both relevant to practitioners and empirically sound. This is the very challenge faced by researchers at Dutch universities of applied sciences. In this paper we build on the findings of an action research project into the research practices of a Research Centre at a Dutch university of applied sciences. We found that action research (AR) works best when conceptualised as three intertwined processes: (1) a joint inquiry with practitioners aimed at improving their actions and reflections on their own practice; (2) a collaborative review with (representative) practitioners and management researchers aimed at conceptualising the issue and process of the joint inquiry; and (3) making a contribution to academic theory through a published paper building on theory related to the specific content and process of the inquiry. This paper will argue that this triple process structure can encompass the Lego AR project—one of the few published in a leading academic journal—as well as new conceptualisations of practice research (Goldkuhl, 2011, 2012) and meta‑action research (Fletcher et al., 2010). As such it can be of value for all researchers looking to balance the competing demands of rigour and relevance.

 

Keywords: practice-based research, practice research, action research, meta-action research, Triple Process Structure, process levels

 

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Journal Article

Using Insider Action Research in the Study of Digital Entrepreneurial Processes: A Pragmatic Design Choice  pp85-98

Kisito Futonge Nzembayie

© Oct 2017 Volume 15 Issue 2, Editor: Ann Brown, pp57 - 141

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Abstract

The field of entrepreneurship is yet to exhaust the gamut of qualitative design choices for use in researching the entrepreneurial process. For this reason, this paper proposes that insider action research (IAR), with its iterative, immersive and emergent form of inquiry, presents a pragmatic design choice for understanding the nature of uncertainty surrounding the digital entrepreneurial process. Since entrepreneurship in the digital context is a highly dynamic and fluid process, IAR appears well‑suited for use in researching the phenomenon. Yet, the paucity of its application in entrepreneurship research, and less so in the emerging digital space, is rather puzzling. Thus, using a real time case study of a new venture creation process in the e‑learning sector, this paper contributes by elucidating how this mode of inquiry might be set up and applied in digital entrepreneurship experimentation. Even though the longitudinal study at hand is still unfolding, the completion of two IAR cycles serves to demonstrate how a symbiotic interweaving of new venture creation and new knowledge production can provide the basis for extracting valuable insights about the digital entrepreneurial process.

 

Keywords: insider action research, researching entrepreneurship, digital entrepreneurship

 

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Journal Article

Researching Organisational Change in Higher Education: A Holistic Tripartite Approach  pp150-161

Dr Lois Farquharson, Dr Tammi Sinha, Susanne Clarke

© Oct 2018 Volume 16 Issue 3, Editor: Ann Brown, pp103 - 172

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Abstract

In the UK context, it is important to acknowledge that there are multiple change drivers in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) that result in a proliferation of foci. Gornitzka (1999) and Allen (2003) suggest that the distinctiveness of governance, professional autonomy and the tradition of academic freedom in HEIs should be reflected in change processes, and therefore traditional frameworks for change could be adapted in an attempt to research and manage change. This paper explores how theoretical and practical tools for managing and researching change can be integrated in order to support change, whilst reflecting on the methods used. The journey of the authors towards the development of a holistic framework for researching and supporting change in Higher Education (HE), with a focus on two HEIs, is explored. The synergies of Lean Management (Wincel and Krull, 2013), Appreciative Inquiry (Cooperrider and Srivastva 1987), and Participatory Action Research (Greenwood et al, 1993) are examined through three stages of practice‑based fieldwork to establish their positioning within a holistic tripartite framework for researching and supporting organizational change. The benefits and challenges of this framework are discussed with attention to the importance of future research to provide more evidence of the impact of this framework.

 

Keywords: Appreciative Inquiry, Organisational Change, Lean Management, World café, Story-telling, Participative Action Research.

 

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Journal Article

Gender Reflexivity: A Missing Element from Action Research in Information Systems  pp50-58

Teresa Waring

© Jan 2002 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Arthur Money, pp1 - 58

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Abstract

Much of the literature on AR in IS appears to have forgotten its radical roots and its subjective epistemology. More rigorous, mechanistic approaches and control mechanisms are continuing to emerge rather than more insightful and innovative methods of interpretation and reflexivity to facilitate making sense of the research. AR is a methodology, like ethnography, that involves people and as such is subject to organisational power and politics that can have dimensions of age, race, social class as well as gender. This paper argues that action researchers involved in information systems development should become more critical in their approach and provide insight into their research by avoiding linguistic reductionism and sanitised stories that remove the struggle, conflict and injustice inherent in all organisations involved in change. This can be done in a variety of ways. One such approach is by developing and presenting stories that are interpreted through different lenses that reveal to the reader new dimensions in the research. The lens used in this paper is a gender lens.

 

Keywords: Action Research, Information Systems development

 

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Journal Article

Conceptualising Participatory Action Research — Three Different Practices  pp47-58

Stefan Cronholm, Göran Goldkuhl

© Jul 2003 Volume 2 Issue 2, Editor: Arthur Money, pp47 - 170

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Abstract

The aim of this paper is to elaborate on the concept of action research. With inspiration from work performed by Checkland and McKay & Marshall the conceptualisation we are suggesting is illustrated in a model consisting of three different practices. Action research means that a research practice and a business practice are interacting. This interaction constitutes a third practice, which is at the same time a business change practice and an intervening empirical research practice. In the paper, we show how the three practices are interlinked to each other. The analysis is based on a work practice theory (ToP).

 

Keywords: Action Research, Information Systems Research, Practice Theory

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 2 / Oct 2017  pp57‑141

Editor: Ann Brown

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Editorial

ec6b0d90e60fa8dcfba4e184b3080a78Dr Ann Brown is a Senior Lecturer in Information Management in the Faculty of Management at Cass Business School and Associate Dean for the Undergraduate programme. She took an MSc (Operational Research) at LSE while working at the British Steel Corporation as an Operational Researcher. She obtained her doctorate from City University in 2005, based on her work into the problems and potential of Information Systems applications to create Business Value for organisations. She supports a number of IS academic conferences through her work as a member of conference committees. She was a member of the editorial panel for Information and Management until 2008. Her research spans the exploitation of IS in organisations, the application of qualitative research methods and the impact of non traditional Teaching and Learning methods on student achievement, such as activity based learning. 

 

Keywords: qualitative, methodology, saturation, sampling, interview, coding, gerund, data analysis, constructivist grounded theory, whole networks, inter-organizational networks, evolving markets, connected health, network ethnography, anthropological research methods, insider action research, researching entrepreneurship, digital entrepreneurship, Psychogeography, focus groups, career success, gender, qualitative research, corporate culture, CQR, qualitative methods, management research, document analysis, semi-structured interviews, Delphi, Delphi method characteristics, Delphi method variants, Information systems research, Taxonomy, Taxonomy development, Phenomenology, Arts Research, Qualitative Methodology, Alchemy Methodology, arts-based research, Husserl

 

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