The Electronic Journal of Business Research Methods provides perspectives on topics relevant to research in the field of business and management
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Journal Article

Structural Equation Modelling: Guidelines for Determining Model Fit  pp53-60

Daire Hooper, Joseph Coughlan, Michael R. Mullen

© Sep 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, ECRM 2008, Editor: Ann Brown, pp1 - 94

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Abstract

The following paper presents current thinking and research on fit indices for structural equation modelling. The paper presents a selection of fit indices that are widely regarded as the most informative indices available to researchers. As well as outlining each of these indices, guidelines are presented on their use. The paper also provides reporting strategies of these indices and concludes with a discussion on the future of fit indices.

 

Keywords: Structural equation modelling, fit indices, covariance structure modelling, reporting structural equation modelling, model fit

 

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Journal Article

Group Model Building Using System Dynamics: An Analysis of Methodological Frameworks  pp35-45

Celine Berard

© Sep 2010 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Ann Brown, pp1 - 62

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Abstract

The main objective of this paper is to study existing methodological frameworks on group modelling projects using system dynamics. Such projects are more and more applied in organizations in order to support their strategic decisions. In this research, key frameworks were first identified and then classified allowing for an in‑depth analysis. The results of this analysis indicate that existing frameworks proposing a global vision of projects are scarce. Moreover, few of them consider both aspects of structure and process simultaneously. In addition, three crucial issues are highlighted: the elicitation of participants knowledge, the establishment of a consensus among participants, and the aspects of facilitation.

 

Keywords: : system dynamics, group model building, modelling process, methodological frameworks, systematic analysis

 

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Journal Article

The Effect of Misspecification of Reflective and Formative Constructs in Operations and Manufacturing Management Research  pp34-52

Subhadip Roy, Monideepa Tarafdar, T.S. Ragu-Nathan, Erica Marsillac

© Jan 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, Editor: Ann Brown, pp1 - 52

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Abstract

This paper highlights theoretical and mathematical differences between formative and reflective measurement models, in the context of academic SEM oriented research in Operations and Manufacturing Management, an area of significant current interest. It discusses problems associated with measurement model misspecification. It further illustrates, using survey data, the effects of possible misspecification on model fit parameters and path coefficients in a nomological model, using the Partial Least Squares (PLS) approach. It then proposes guidelines for the use of the PLS methodology for analyzing formative measurement models.

 

Keywords: formative, reflective, measurement models, PLS, structural equation modeling, model misspecification

 

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Journal Article

Finite Mixture Models in Market Segmentation: A Review and Suggestions for Best Practices  pp2-15

Michael Tuma, Reinhold Decker

© Jun 2013 Volume 11 Issue 1, Editor: Ann Brown, pp1 - 50

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Abstract

Recently, Andrews, Brusco and Currim (2010) noted that some of the hesitancy on the part of practitioners to adopt model‑based (MB) methods in market segmentation (MS) may stem from an insufficient awareness of their performance relative to their non‑model‑based (NMB) counterparts. Comparisons of MB and NMB methods should provide business researchers with information as to precise conditions in which the former should be preferred. Moreover, finite mixture models (FMMs) have grown in their use since 2000 and, as there is no recent survey‑based empirical literature examining their application, a comprehensive review of their usage in segmentation research seems to be of use. This article discusses some of the critical issues involved when using FMMs to segment markets, takes a closer look at comparison simulation studies in order to highlight conditions under which a business analyst might consider the application of an FMM approach, discusses model selection as well as validation issues and provides suggestions for best practices and potential improvements. Furthermore, it presents an empirical survey that seeks to provide an up‑to‑date assessment of FMM application in MS.

 

Keywords: market segmentation, model-based clustering, finite mixture models, latent class models

 

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Journal Article

Employing a Mixed Methods Approach to Benefit Business‑IT Alignment and Levels of Maturity  pp48-61

Sally Eaves

© Dec 2015 Volume 13 Issue 1, Mixed Methods, Editor: Ros Cameron, pp1 - 61

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper examines the design, implementation, benefits and challenges of employing a mixed methods research approach with the aim to provide an emergent, integrative and multi‑layered perspective on Business‑IT alignment influences and maturit y measurement. The application of mixed methods is underutilised in this domain and it is opined that it can serve to elucidate this perennial, but often elusive, core objective of senior management. It also begins to redress the predominance of quantitat ive studies and the frequent application of tools and techniques in isolation, not combination. The case of a leading UK Communications Service Provider in a two year period of joint venture integration provides a transformational context for examination, with a methodological focus. It is argued that mixed methods can achieve a mutually supporting depth and breadth of coverage that is appropriate to complex and multifaceted phenomena such as Business‑IT alignment and facilitates consideration of both pr ocess and outcomes. A transparently presented two phased, sequential exploratory and emergent design is adopted, with embedded integration. This is underpinned by a reflexive and intelligent‑action orientated pragmatic lens. Innovative use of observation, photography, interviews, focus groups and survey data are synthesised to unfold the Business‑IT alignment relationship, whilst the Strategic Alignment Maturity Model supports incremental maturity evaluation. The approach facilitates a responsive, integr ative, pluralistic and holistic evaluation of alignment and maturity measurement, moving beyond traditional snapshot techniques. It encourages reflexive, in situ surfacing of core themes and builds cumulative insight into the fluctuating impact of events, interventions and culture. The design benefits data richness, elaboration, validation, illustration and the identification of situated knowledge regarding enablers, inhibitors and interdependencies. Further, a robust and repeatable assessment of maturity can be achieved to support benchmarking and

 

Keywords: Keywords: Mixed Methods Research, Business-IT Alignment, Strategic Alignment Maturity Model, SAMM, Strategic Alignment, Joint Venture, Communications Sector

 

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Journal Article

Validation of Simulation Based Models: A Theoretical Outlook  pp39-46

Morvin Savio Martis

© Nov 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Arthur Money, pp1 - 66

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Abstract

Validation is the most incomprehensible part of developing a model. Nevetheless, no model can be accepted unless it has passed the tests of validation, since the procedure of validation is vital to ascertain the credibility of the model. Validation procedures are usually framework based and dynamic, but a methodical procedure can be followed by a modeller (researcher) in order to authenticate the model. The paper starts with a discussion on the views and burning issues by various researchers on model validation and the foundational terminology involved. The paper later highlights on the methodology and the process of validation adopted. Reasons for the failure of the model have also been explored. The paper finally focuses on the widely approved validation schemes (both quantitative and qualitative) and techniques in practice, since no one test can determine the credibility and validity of a simulation model. Moreover, as the model passes more tests (both quantitative and qualitative) the confidence in the model increases correspondingly.

 

Keywords: Validation, simulation, dynamic models, validation schemes, validation process, modelling

 

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Journal Article

Scale Development Process: Service Quality in Car Rental Services  pp161-174

Erdogan H. Ekiz, Ali Bavik

© Nov 2008 Volume 6 Issue 2, Editor: Ann Brown, pp123 - 216

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Abstract

This paper aims to provide an example for developing a measurement scale by using car rental services as a case. To do so, both qualitative and quantitative methods are utilized in three fundamental stages recommended by Churchill (1979) and Parasuraman, Zeithaml & Berry (1988). In following their footsteps, the first qualitative research was undertaken in the form of 23 in‑depth interviews which produced 61 items that described user perceptions. Then, a quantitative study was undertaken to purify the scale items, examine dimensionality, reliability, factor structure and validity. After a rigorous statistical analysis an 18‑itemed scale with six factors emerged. The paper also introduces the setting of the research and presents need for scale development briefly which is followed by discussion, implications and limitations.

 

Keywords: Scale development, measurement, fundamental stages, value of fit measures, models, car rental services, North Cyprus

 

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Journal Article

Mixed Methodology Approach to Place Attachment and Consumption Behaviour: a Rural Town Perspective  pp107-116

Maria Ryan

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, ECRM 2009, Editor: Ann Brown, Joseph Azzopardi, Frank Bezzina, pp1 - 116

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Abstract

This paper discusses the use of both qualitative and quantitative methodologies in examining the influence people's attachment to their environment had on a number of consumption behaviours made by residents of a regional town in Western Australia. It discusses the concept of place attachment; its relationship with community attachment and the subsequent perceived value ascribed to living in the regional town of Narrogin, Western Australia. The use of a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods provided an opportunity to take a macro perspective in quantifying major place and community attachment influencers in the consumption decision‑making process, while understanding the meanings and sentiment behind these concepts from a micro perspective. In‑depth interviews were undertaken with thirty‑two residents of Narrogin. These interviews used a photo‑elicitation technique in which residents were given a camera and required to take photographs of important places, people and aspects of their lives. The photos were then used as prompts for personal interviews, as respondents discussed the meaning, sentiments and stories behind the chosen photographs. The interviews provided a richness and depth to our understanding of the value of respondents' attachment to Narrogin. The use of this technique as a forerunner to the quantitative phase is discussed and recommendations for future use are detailed. The second phase of data collection involved a telephone survey of residents from Narrogin and its surrounding area (Shire of Narrogin). This was designed to test a model and a number of hypotheses developed from the literature and the qualitative phase of the research. The model presented place and community attachment as separate, yet related constructs affecting the perceived value ascribed to living in Narrogin. Value was seen as a mediating construct between place and community attachment and consumption (shopping and staying in Narrogin) decisions. Shopping decisions included shopping for everyday grocery items, white goods, farm equipment and machinery and various services including educational, medical and aged care. Exploratory Factor Analysis and Structural Equation Modelling were used to examine the prescribed model. The results identified different attachment weightings for the town and shire communities. In general, the model was a better predictor for the shire residents than it was for town residents. The results suggest different types of management strategies are required for businesses providing for the needs of town and for shire residents based on respective residents different attachment weightings. The paper discusses the use of the photo‑elicitation technique in the in‑depth interview stage of the research and its contribution to the development of the model as presented in the quantitative phase. Operationalising the constructs in this study has been, and still is, challenging for researchers. This paper provides valuable insights into the operationalisation process by utilising the combined methodologies approach. Uncovering stories, meanings and emotions can be integrated with an objective epistemology of attachment.

 

Keywords: mixed methodology, photo-elicitation technique, structural equation modelling, place attachment, community attachment, rural sustainability

 

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